April 25, 2016 tamusociety@gmail.com

A Year After the Earthquakes in Nepal

Dear Friends:

Today marks the one-year anniversary of the earthquake in Nepal that ravaged much of the country. It is a heart-wrenching moment to remember the thousands of lives tragically cut short and the millions of people still suffering from the aftermath of the devastation.

On behalf of Hamro Nepal family, I am writing to express my sincere gratitude for the generous support that was received during last spring, following the disaster. We are saddened to report that, as a result of the complex political transition, the reconstruction efforts have been stalled in Nepal. The rebuilding in Nepal has been slow, to say the least. Funds donated from around world (close to $4 billion) were on hold for an entire year (!) due to (among many reasons) serious political protests that ensued after a new constitution being passed in Sept 2015 and a new leadership taking over the National Reconstruction Agency (NRA).  However, the recent developments in Nepal are promising in terms of the NRA making some positive inroads, which gives us hope that the reconstruction efforts will soon commence in full swing. If you would like to read further on the current situation in Nepal, please find below a selected list of articles. We would also greatly appreciate it if you can consider joining us for a public talk on Nepal earthquakes on May 6th in NYC, which is being co-organized by International Crisis Group and India China Institute.

As indicated earlier, Hamro Nepal is partnering with four credible and committed Nepali organizations and local communities to help rebuild primary schools and multipurpose community centers in Gorkha, Kavre, Sindhupalchowk, and Dolakha districts. Our approach is both to help address the imminent infrastructure needs and to engage with communities for meeting long-term educational needs in rural Nepal.  Despite the delays, we are sincerely grateful for your support and your patience as we navigate through this complex political situation in Nepal. Rest assured, your contributions will aid in the much-needed  reconstruction process. On behalf of Hamro Nepal team and the partnering organizations, I would like to thank you for your support, thoughts, and trust as we continue to do our part in the reconstruction efforts of Nepal.

Last but not the least, our thoughts go out to all those who have suffered/suffering from recent earthquakes in Haiti, Japan, Equador, and Burma.

Here are some reasons why and how funds are delayed:
The Great Divide by Shradha Ghale
Why were discussions about relief and rebuilding being conducted in a language that was so removed from lived experience of most affected people? What kinds of solutions will emerge from a discussion that excludes its main subject from starting point?
The Aftermath by Anup Kafle
Anup Kaphle returned home to find a country that has been failed by its government — and ignored by the world.
The Year That Was by Subina Shrestha
What momentous happening would it take for Nepal to change?
This story of resilience, hard work, and optimism is also very common:
Kartok Lama is a disabled woman from Langtang whose small teashop was destroyed in Nepal’s earthquake. Her village was buried by an avalanche, but she is determined to rebuild.

 

Deeper Reading: 

The New York Times Review of Books just reviewed two books on Nepal that are phenomenal.

If you are interested in understanding Nepal’s modern history, civil war, myth and why and how this country is where it is today, you might want to read:

Battles of the New Republic: A Contemporary History of Nepal by Prashant Jha

Kathmandu by Thomas Bell

The Bullet and the Ballot Box, Aditya Adhikari